WWII’s reenactors pushed me to the deep end.

I love old things. I love the way they look. I love their textures, their smells (sometimes), and the stories that have seeped into the cracks and patina finishes. I guess I’m talking specifically about the WWII era and older. If I was born in 1879 rather than 1979 I’d like to imagine myself at the forefront of the development of moving-pictures. Maybe I’d be cranking one of these for Buster Keaton or working as a gag-man for Harold Lloyd. for  I can’t say that I hate all modern things though because modernity is allowing me to have something called a ‘web~site’ through which I am communicating to you right now. I enjoy putting a pile of clothes in a metal box and having them come out clean. I will say though that it’s the look of modernity I can do without. If I “let myself go” so to speak , I would doubtlessly live a lifestyle pretty close to this woman’s lifestyle or perhaps Edna’s lifestyle. You have no idea how appealing that sounds to me. I’d still use Colgate and but can’t I have it in a simple, old-timey tube that looks more like oil paint than toothpaste?

Then I had an epiphany and with it, I’m inching more and more towards Edna’s part of town. WWII Reenactors. Yes, those boys love authenticity and I figured there’s got to be great modern reproductions of old ephemera & daily use items that soldiers would’ve had during wartime made specifically for niche market. A little bit of internet sleuthing and bing~O:

Motherload! There’s all sorts of everyday 1940’s era reproductions of toiletries and other household products out there made for WWII Reenactors that I will have to legally commandeer with currency. If you’re thinking what I’m thinking, here’s a link to a WWII Supply website.

I’m coming, Edna. I’ll hand ink you a letter or better yet, send ya a telegram to tell you that it seems that I’ll be seeing you soon on those grassy plains of off-the-deepend-ness!

 

Thriftscore! vintage late 1800’s Ice Box

Vintage White Clad Ice Box

This is better than a thriftscore. This is another one of my favorite ways to procure neat antique items: picking them up from the side of the road for free.

Our neighbors just moved out. They were taking care of their elderly grandmother and sadly, I believe she passed away. What’s even more gloomy is that it looks like the lot of grandmother’s things were put in the front yard with a sign that said “FREE”. The kids in our neighborhood are particularly savage and within hours they were using this woman’s crutches like stilts, racing around in her wheelchair and were literally smashing the rest of the items with a hammer simply because the stuff said “FREE” and they felt they were free to destroy it. It’s true, we asked them and that was their response.

I love the past simply for it’s own sake and I treasure the stories behind old things so I was glad to have rescued at least one item laid out in the yard to be given away and good care will be given to at least one item that belonged to this elderly woman. A “vintage” White Clad ice box from the late 1800’s. I put quotations around vintage because it’s most certainly a reproduction. I don’t mind that. In researching it a bit, even the repros of this go for around Truth be told, I may’ve just glossed over it if it weren’t for it’s unique hardware. I love the latch and the manufacturer’s plate on the front. From what I can tell it’s real brass.

The door opens and there’s a small bit of storage inside. I thought perhaps to use it as a night stand or and end table. Uninspired reuses, I know. Do any of you have any more clever ideas on a possible use for this neat little thing?

PS – my readership has spiked alot in the last few days. Where are all you coming from?!

PPS – please notice my fantastic Queen poster in the background of the first pic.

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